pdf TripStop S and X Profile Testing Popular

509 downloads

Full independent testing by MTS comparing TS75X against TS75S. No question the TS75S performed better. 

pdf Shear Connector Comparison Popular

829 downloads

This is an official RMIT University document designed to effectively compare the different types of shear connectors available at the time of publication. Simple control joints such as score line cuts or saw cuts are commonly used in the construction of concrete footpaths. These joints do not have a load transfer mechanism and therefore displacement of the concrete slab panels will create a differential vertical movement at the joint when the footpaths are affected by tree root invasion or by soil movement. This differential vertical movement of adjoining slabs create a major tripping hazard to pedestrians. In this study, three types of joiners (connectors) made of aluminium, EPDM rubber and PVC have been studied to examine their capability for minimizing the tripping hazard.

pdf Expert Opinion on mesh through joints. Popular

1210 downloads

This report is written by Jay Sanjayan, PhD, Professor of Concrete Structures in response to a request by TripStop Pty Ltd to comment on the practice of using continuous steel reinforcement as dowels to prevent vertical movements along saw‐cut joints.

pdf 125mm TripStop Test Report Popular

936 downloads

While we dont make TS125X anymore and have TS125S as a better product this report presents the findings of laboratory tests on TS125X TripStopTM PVC joiners. These tests were conducted in the Heavy Structures Laboratory of the School of Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. A full-scale prototype residential concrete pavement (footpath / sidewalk) 5m long, 1.5m wide and 125mm thick was cast on a steel testing frame. The testing frame was designed in such a way that the formwork can be removed from underneath the concrete slabs and the slabs can be jacked up from virtually any point – to simulate various scenarios of tree root invasion and soil expansion/movement.

pdf 125mm TripStop Freeze Thaw Test Report Popular

753 downloads

This report presents the findings of freeze / thaw tests on TS125X TripStopTM PVC joiners. These tests were conducted in the Heavy Structures Laboratory of the School of Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. A full-scale prototype residential concrete pavement (footpath / sidewalk) 5m long, 1.5m wide and 125mm thick was cast on a steel testing frame. The testing frame was designed in such a way that the formwork can be removed from underneath the concrete slabs and the slabs can be jacked up from virtually any point – to simulate various scenarios of tree root invasion and soil expansion / movement.

pdf 100mm TripStop Test Report Popular

693 downloads

This report presents the findings of laboratory tests on TS100X TripStopTM PVC joiners. These tests were conducted in the Heavy Structures Laboratory of the School of Civil and Chemical Engineering at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. A full scale prototype residential pavement (footpath / sidewalk) 5m long, 1.5m wide and 100 mm thick was cast on a steel frame. The testing frame was designed in such a way that the formwork can be removed from underneath the concrete slabs and the slabs can be jacked up from virtually any point – to simulate various scenarios of tree root invasion and soil expansion/movement.

pdf TS100X VS SL72 MESH Popular

982 downloads

This is an official report produced by Melbourne Testing Services. It outlines the full testing of TripStop TS100X and SL72 mesh reinforced 100mm thick concrete, performed on the 4th of April 2014. We now 20/4/2016] intend to lay an in situ mesh path and an insitu TripStop path side by side to prove what we say will happen will in fact happen in a real life situation. Stay tuned. 

pdf 75mm TripStop Test Report Popular

831 downloads

This report presents the findings of laboratory tests on TS75X TripStopTM PVC joiners. These tests were conducted in the Heavy Structures Laboratory of the School of Civil and Chemical Engineering at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. A full scale prototype concrete footpath 5m long, 1.5m wide and 75mm thick was cast on a steel frame. The testing frame was designed in such a way that the formwork can be removed from underneath the concrete slabs and the slabs can be jacked up from virtually any point – to simulate various scenarios of tree root invasion and soil expansion/movement.